THE ROLE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION POLICIES IN THE GOVERNANCE OF THE HEALTHCARE SECTOR

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Barileé B. Baridam, Irene Govender

DOI:10.22495/rcgv6i3art5

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Abstract

Information and communication technology (ICT) is today an indispensable tool in the development of countries and economies, driving growth in many other sectors, including the health sector. The effective governance of the health sector demands enabling ICT policies. Healthcare is a key area in the development and growth of nations. A country that neglects this sector will definitely witness a decline in socio-economic development. Application of ICT in this sector is non-negotiable and an imperative. However, with diversities in policy ICT’s impact is not felt in many communities, and linking ICT and other business strategies is a big challenge. Availability of resources upon which ICT itself thrives is another factor limiting its impact upon the lives of the populations of most developing nations. Cultural diversity and technology problems seem to stand prominent among challenges impeding the impact of ICT on developing nations. Against this backdrop, this paper takes a critical look at the implementation and efficiency of ICT in healthcare delivery within the Nigerian context. The purpose is to assist those bodies responsible for ICT policy and implementation to enable the benefits of ICT to trickle through to the populace. We are also of the opinion that the adequate implementation of ICT policy in the health sector in the most populous black nation (Nigeria) will go a long way to influence its implementation in neighbouring nations.

Keywords: ICT, Healthcare, Technology, Development, Policy, Governance

How to cite this paper: Baridam, B., & Govender, I. (2016). The role of information and communication policies in the governance of the healthcare sector. Risk governance & control: financial markets & institutions, 6(3), 31-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.22495/rcgv6i3art5