OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE AND FIRM PERFORMANCE IN EMERGING MARKETS: EVIDENCE FROM CHINESE LISTED FIRMS

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Benjamin I. Ehikioya, Qin Yuanjin, Xie Keifa, Chen Yun

DOI:10.22495/cocv6i3c4p5

Abstract

This study investigates how ownership structure impacts on the corporate performance of listed firms in China. The study uses sample data of firms listed in the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges for the five year fiscal period that ended 2005. The results of the panel data regression analysis suggests firm performance to have positive and significant relation with the proportion of shares held by the institution, through the legal person holding companies. In addition, while state ownership indicates negative influence on performance, individual and foreign investors are found to have positive effect on performance, though at a minimal levels. Interestingly, the effect of ownership structure is stronger in firms experiencing the dominance of legal person share holdings over state shares. Further, firm size and ratio of debt to equity are also observed to have influence on the performance of Chinese listed firms. These findings are of great significant to policymakers, academics, shareholders and other stakeholders.

Keywords: Ownership Structure, Firm Performance, Chinese Listed Firms, Shareholders, Corporate Governance

How to cite this paper: Ehikioya, B. I., Yuanjin, Q., Keifa, X., & Yun, C.
(2009). Ownership structure and firm performance in emerging markets: evidence from Chinese listed firms. Corporate Ownership & Control, 6(3-4), 465-472. http://doi.org/10.22495/cocv6i3c4p5